What Your Nursing Textbook Didn’t Teach

Congratulations! You got your first job as a nurse! Now you’re ready to put your countless hours of clinical, simulation, labs and classes to work! While nursing school is your foundation and your backbone, there are just some things that nursing school cannot possibly prepare you for adequately. In school, you learn expected outcomes — how things are supposed to happen. For most, you get an 8hr, not 12hr day for clinical (not that I’d really want a 12 hour clinical day), a 1-2 patient assignment, get the occasional med pass, but you’re still in a practice or ‘safe’ mode. Continue Reading

Communicating with Providers as a New Nurse

The orders that are written for our patients is essentially our toolbox. In the CVICU, we have autonomy to be able to titrate meds like insulin, heparin and pressors, but there will come a time when you run out of tools or you’re not sure which tool to use.  Effective communication with the provider allows you to get what you need, or further understand why you’re using a Phillips screwdriver instead of a flathead. As a student nurse, I rarely interacted with providers.  If a question was asked and I knew the answer, I’d respond, but as for advocating for Continue Reading

New Grad Nurse in the CVICU

Disclaimer: The original post was posted back in 2014, I’ve added somethings and updates! After doing my clinical rotations on general med-surg floors, interventional cardiology, neurosurgery and peds… I felt most comfortable and the most confident when I stepped into the ICU.  I don’t know what it is about it, but I enjoy every part of being on a critical care unit.  It was never scary for me seeing patients with a Christmas tree of IV pumps with lines and drains literally coming out of every orifice.  I wanted to be an ICU nurse and I made that dream a Continue Reading