CRNA Interview Experience

I applied to CRNA school the moment the application was available on July 1, 2015. My recommendation letters were already in, and I was scheduled to take the GRE the following month.  Once I took the GRE’s, my scores were received by the school August 25 and my application was officially marked as complete. 2 weeks later I received a notification that my application was being moved to the interview round! (This is why I stress preparing for your interview once your application is in.) A month later, I was at the school, a nervous wreck, interviewing for one of the Continue Reading

SRNA Survival Series: Self-Care Part 1

When you decide to start CRNA school, one of the biggest challenges is realizing that life doesn’t stop for you.   Unlike my undergrad days where all I had on my plate was school, the occasional fight with the boyfriend or girl drama, there weren’t as many distractions and stressors as there are now. “Me” time suddenly turned into Me + Nagelhout + 8 hrs sitting at my desk.  I don’t want you all to develop that equation every single day because it only equals one thing = STRESS. (ok… I got bars though! haha) Before starting your semester, whether it Continue Reading

Acceptance Letter.

And, when you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.  – Paulo Coelho. I’ve been accepted to CRNA school. After hours of studying for the GRE’s, obtaining CCRN and CSC certifications and making sure my ACLS/BLS were up to date, I finally applied. Did I think  I was going to get in? No way. Am I happy that I’m in? Absolutely. It’s been a long while since I posted, I’ve been busy preparing for school, taking grad classes and doing a bit of TRAVEL NURSING! However, I felt compelled to start up my blog again. Continue Reading

What Your Nursing Textbook Didn’t Teach

Congratulations! You got your first job as a nurse! Now you’re ready to put your countless hours of clinical, simulation, labs and classes to work! While nursing school is your foundation and your backbone, there are just some things that nursing school cannot possibly prepare you for adequately. In school, you learn expected outcomes — how things are supposed to happen. For most, you get an 8hr, not 12hr day for clinical (not that I’d really want a 12 hour clinical day), a 1-2 patient assignment, get the occasional med pass, but you’re still in a practice or ‘safe’ mode. Continue Reading